Bio-Resonance Results Glossary Vitals Thyroid Health and Functions

Thyroid Function (TFTs)

This is a collective term for blood tests used to check the function of the thyroid. TFTs may be requested if a patient is thought to suffer from hyperthyroidism (overactive thyroid) or hypothyroidism (underactive thyroid), or to monitor the effectiveness of either thyroid-suppression or hormone replacement therapy.
  
Here’s a perfect example of what your thyroid does; it works very similar to the thermostat in your house. If the thyroid is too active and produces too much of the T4 and T3 hormones (which control your body’s metabolism), it’s like having a thermostat that’s set too high…So the house gets overheated. If it’s not active enough, it’s set too low and the house is too cold. And if it’s making just the right amount of T4 and T3 hormones, then it keeps the temperature just right.
 
Here’s a perfect example of what your thyroid does; it works very similar to the thermostat in your house. If the thyroid is too active and produces too much of the T4 and T3 hormones (which control your body’s metabolism), it’s like having a thermostat that’s set too high…So the house gets overheated. If it’s not active enough, it’s set too low and the house is too cold. And if it’s making just the right amount of T4 and T3 hormones, then it keeps the temperature just right.
  

Anti-Thyroglobulin Antibody

Your thyroid uses thyroglobulin to make the active thyroid hormones.

If you have an autoimmune condition, it can disrupt your production of thyroglobulin. An autoimmune condition happens when your immune system creates antibodies that attack your body’s own healthy cells. When your immune system attacks the thyroid, it often targets thyroglobulin. This causes it to produce antithyroglobulin antibodies.

Your thyroid is a gland located in your neck. It releases hormones that control your metabolism. It produces a number of different proteins, including thyroglobulin. Your thyroid uses thyroglobulin to make the active thyroid hormones.

If you have an autoimmune condition, it can disrupt your production of thyroglobulin. An autoimmune condition happens when your immune system creates antibodies that attack your body’s own healthy cells. When your immune system attacks the thyroid, it often targets thyroglobulin. This causes it to produce antithyroglobulin antibodies.

If you do have small amounts in your blood, it may be a sign of certain health problems, such as:

  • Type 1 diabetes
  • Pernicious anemia, a drop in red blood cells caused by a vitamin B-12 deficiency 
  • Collagen vascular diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis and scleroderma 
  • Thyroid cancer

If you have high levels of antithyroglobulin antibodies in your blood, it may be a sign of serious autoimmune disorder, such as Graves’ disease or Hashimoto thyroiditis.

In some cases, you may have antithyroglobulin antibodies in your blood without any specific complications. If you test positive for these antibodies, and your doctor can’t identify an underlying cause, they may monitor you for emerging health problems.

 

Anti-Thyroid Peroxidase Antibody

An anti-thyroid microsomal antibody test is also called a thyroid peroxidase test. It measures anti-thyroid microsomal antibodies in your blood. Your body produces these antibodies when cells in your thyroid become damaged. If you have an autoimmune disease or thyroid disorder, your antibody levels may rise. A positive test indicates an abnormal result and may be due to a variety of conditions, including:

  • Hashimoto’s thyroiditis, which is a swelling of the thyroid gland that often results in reduced thyroid function
  • Graves’ disease, which is an autoimmune disorder in which the thyroid gland is overactive
  • Granulomatous thyroiditis, or subacute thyroiditis, which is a swelling of the thyroid gland that usually follows an upper respiratory infection
  • Autoimmune hemolytic anemia, which is a drop in the number of red blood cells due to increased destruction by the immune system
  • nontoxic nodular goiter, which is an enlargement of the thyroid gland with cysts called nodules
  • Sjogren’s syndrome, which is an autoimmune disorder in which the glands that produce tears and saliva are damaged
  • Systemic lupus erythematosus, which is a long-term autoimmune disorder affecting your skin, joints, kidneys, brain, and other organs
  • Rheumatoid arthritis
  • Thyroid cancer

Women with high levels of anti-thyroid microsomal antibodies have a higher risk of:

  • Miscarriage
  • Preeclampsia
  • Premature birth
  • Difficulty with in vitro fertilization

Having anti-thyroid antibodies in your blood doesn’t automatically mean you have a thyroid disease. However, you may be at increased risk for future thyroid disease, and your doctor may want to monitor your condition. For unknown reasons, the risk tends to be higher in women.

 

Calcitonin

The calcitonin test is primarily used to help diagnose C-cell hyperplasia and medullary thyroid cancer, to evaluate the effectiveness of treatment, and to monitor those affected for recurrence. It is also ordered to screen for medullary thyroid cancer in family members of people with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2 (MEN 2). C-cell hyperplasia and medullary thyroid cancer are two rare conditions in which excessive amounts of calcitonin are produced. C-cell hyperplasia is a benign condition that may or may not progress to become medullary thyroid cancer.

A low level of calcitonin means that it is unlikely that symptoms are due to C-cell hyperplasia or medullary thyroid cancer. An elevated concentration of calcitonin means that excessive amounts are being produced. Significantly elevated levels of calcitonin are a good indicator of C-cell hyperplasia or medullary thyroid cancer; however, the healthcare practitioner will use other procedures, such as a thyroid , scan, biopsy and ultrasound, to establish the diagnosis.

With successful treatment for medullary thyroid cancer, which may involve removal of the thyroid gland and often some surrounding tissues, calcitonin levels will usually fall to very low levels. If the values stay low over time, then it is likely that the treatment was effective. In some cases, calcitonin levels will fall but remain moderately elevated after treatment. This means that some calcitonin-producing tissue remains. Healthcare practitioners will monitor calcitonin and watch for increases over time. If calcitonin levels begin to rise, then it is likely that there is a recurrence of medullary thyroid cancer.

With medullary thyroid cancer and C-cell hyperplasia, other thyroid tests, such as T4, T3, and TSH, are usually normal while calcitonin levels are elevated.
Calcitonin levels may also be elevated with lung, breast, and pancreatic cancers, insulinomas (tumor in the pancreas that produces too much insulin), and rare pancreatic tumors called VIPomas (cancer that usually grows from islet cells in the pancreas).

Concentrations of calcitonin may be increased with use of drugs such as epinephrine, glucagon, and oral contraceptives, and are normally higher in newborns as well as in women during pregnancy.

Other conditions with elevated calcitonin include: Intestinal, gastric, or bronchial carcinoid tumors, chronic renal failure, Zollinger-Ellison syndrome, and pernicious anemia. 

  

rT3, Reverse T3

This is a competitive inhibitor to T3 and T4. Leptin resistance is directly correlated with reverse T3. Leptin is a hormone that controls all of energy metabolism in the body. It controls all the other hormones in the body as well. If it is not working well, the rest of your hormones are going to show clinical problems as well. Many people think they have thyroid issues when they actually have leptin resistant. One becomes leptin resistant when the brain no longer recognizes the leptin signal sent from our fat cells. Testing leptin is easy to do but rarely done in medicine today. Biochemically it can be done with thereverse T3 test. Leptin resistance completely turns off your thyroid gland making it so you cannot burn fat in your muscles because it down regulates your basal metabolic rate.

  

T3, Free (Free Triiodothyronine)

Measures the free, unbound levels of the hormone triiodothyronine – the active thyroid hormone at the cellular level. Because the free levels of T3 represent immediately available hormone, free T3 is thought to better reflect the patient’s hormonal status than total T3.

  • Elevated Free T3 – Elevated Free T3 may be indicative of hyperthyroidism.
  • Low Free T3 – Low Free T3 levels below the reference range may be indicative of hypothyroidism.
  • Optimal Free T3 – Some integrative physicians and hormone experts state that if free T3 is not in the top half – or even the top quarter – of the reference range, it is not optimal. 

 

T4, Free

This measures the free, unbound thyroxine levels (the storage hormone), in your bloodstream. Free T4 is typically elevated in hyperthyroidism, and lowered in hypothyroidism. Free or unbound T4 levels represent the level of hormone available for uptake and use by cells. Because the free levels of T4 represent immediately available hormone, free T4 is thought to better reflect the patient’s hormonal status than total T4.

 


TSH, Thyroid-Stimulating Hormone

This is a hormone that stimulates the thyroid gland to produce T3 and T4. Releasing hormone from the hypothalamus causes the release of the hormone TSH from the anterior pituitary gland, which finally allows the release of the hormones T3 and T4 from the thyroid gland.  

You could have a perfectly functioning thyroid; but if your pituitary gland is not sending over the correct TSH levels to your thyroid telling it to go to work… Then it doesn’t. If that is the case, you have a lack of T4 & T3 hormones being produced in your body; a condition known as “hypothyroidism”.
If your pituitary gland is constantly bombarding your thyroid with high TSH levels, it kicks the thyroid into overdrive, and your thyroid starts producing too much T3 & T4 hormones. This is what causes the condition known as “hyperthyroidism”.

 When the thyroid does not produce enough thyroid hormones, the pituitary detects this reduction in thyroid hormones, and it tries to stimulate the thyroid into action by producing and sending over more TSH. This is the pituitary gland’s effort to return the TSH levels to “normal” and balance the thyroid’s function. Therefore, higher TSH levels than normal suggests a thyroid that is under-active and not doing its job of producing thyroid hormone. So, in general, higher levels of thyroid stimulating hormone equals an under-active thyroid; or hypothyroidism.

 And the opposite is true. If the thyroid is overactive and producing too much thyroid hormone, the pituitary senses that there is a thyroid hormone overload circulating through the system.

The pituitary then usually slows or shuts down thyroid stimulation, so that the thyroid will slow down its production of the T3 & T4 hormones. This drop in TSH is the pituitary gland’s attempt to return circulating T3 & T4 hormone levels to normal. Therefore, the TSH test results will show lower than normal TSH when the thyroid is overactive. So, in general, lower TSH levels equals an overactive thyroid; or hyperthyroidism.

 

Thyroid Function (TFTs)
This is a collective term for blood tests used to check the function of the thyroid. TFTs may be requested if a patient is thought to suffer from hyperthyroidism (overactive thyroid) or hypothyroidism (underactive thyroid), or to monitor the effectiveness of either thyroid-suppression or hormone replacement therapy.
The thyroid is a butterfly-shaped gland that sits low on the front of the neck. Your thyroid sits just below your Adam’s apple, along the front of the windpipe. The thyroid has two side lobes, connected by a bridge in the middle. When the thyroid is its normal size, you will not even be able to feel it. The thyroid is responsible for controlling energy consumption by releasing hormones that control your metabolism. It also regulates body temperature, weight, and heart rate.
Here’s a perfect example of what your thyroid does; it works very similar to the thermostat in your house. If the thyroid is too active and produces too much of the T4 and T3 hormones (which control your body’s metabolism), it’s like having a thermostat that’s set too high…So the house gets overheated. If it’s not active enough, it’s set too low and the house is too cold. And if it’s making just the right amount of T4 and T3 hormones, then it keeps the temperature just right.
Thyroid Function

Anti-Thyroglobulin Antibody; Your thyroid uses thyroglobulin to make the active thyroid hormones.
If you have an autoimmune condition, it can disrupt your production of thyroglobulin. An autoimmune condition happens when your immune system creates antibodies that attack your body’s own healthy cells. When your immune system attacks the thyroid, it often targets thyroglobulin. This causes it to produce antithyroglobulin antibodies.
Your thyroid is a gland located in your neck. It releases hormones that control your metabolism. It produces a number of different proteins, including thyroglobulin. Your thyroid uses thyroglobulin to make the active thyroid hormones.
If you have an autoimmune condition, it can disrupt your production of thyroglobulin. An autoimmune condition happens when your immune system creates antibodies that attack your body’s own healthy cells. When your immune system attacks the thyroid, it often targets thyroglobulin. This causes it to produce antithyroglobulin antibodies.
If you do have small amounts in your blood, it may be a sign of certain health problems, such as:

•Type 1 diabetes
•Pernicious anemia, a drop in red blood cells caused by a vitamin B-12 deficiency 
•Collagen vascular diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis and scleroderma 
•Thyroid cancer

If you have high levels of antithyroglobulin antibodies in your blood, it may be a sign of serious autoimmune disorder, such as Graves’ disease or Hashimoto thyroiditis.

In some cases, you may have antithyroglobulin antibodies in your blood without any specific complications. If you test positive for these antibodies, and your doctor can’t identify an underlying cause, they may monitor you for emerging health problems.

Anti-Thyroid Peroxidase Antibody; An anti-thyroid microsomal antibody test is also called a thyroid peroxidase test. It measures anti-thyroid microsomal antibodies in your blood. Your body produces these antibodies when cells in your thyroid become damaged. If you have an autoimmune disease or thyroid disorder, your antibody levels may rise. A positive test indicates an abnormal result and may be due to a variety of conditions, including:
Hashimoto’s thyroiditis, which is a swelling of the thyroid gland that often results in reduced thyroid function
Graves’ disease, which is an autoimmune disorder in which the thyroid gland is overactive
Granulomatous thyroiditis, or subacute thyroiditis, which is a swelling of the thyroid gland that usually follows an upper respiratory infection
Autoimmune hemolytic anemia, which is a drop in the number of red blood cells due to increased destruction by the immune system
nontoxic nodular goiter, which is an enlargement of the thyroid gland with cysts called nodules
Sjogren’s syndrome, which is an autoimmune disorder in which the glands that produce tears and saliva are damaged
Systemic lupus erythematosus, which is a long-term autoimmune disorder affecting your skin, joints, kidneys, brain, and other organs
Rheumatoid arthritis
Thyroid cancer

Women with high levels of anti-thyroid microsomal antibodies have a higher risk of:
miscarriage
preeclampsia
premature birth
difficulty with in vitro fertilization

Having anti-thyroid antibodies in your blood doesn’t automatically mean you have a thyroid disease. However, you may be at increased risk for future thyroid disease, and your doctor may want to monitor your condition. For unknown reasons, the risk tends to be higher in women.

Calcitonin; The calcitonin test is primarily used to help diagnose C-cell hyperplasia and medullary thyroid cancer, to evaluate the effectiveness of treatment, and to monitor those affected for recurrence. It is also ordered to screen for medullary thyroid cancer in family members of people with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2 (MEN 2). C-cell hyperplasia and medullary thyroid cancer are two rare conditions in which excessive amounts of calcitonin are produced. C-cell hyperplasia is a benign condition that may or may not progress to become medullary thyroid cancer.
A low level of calcitonin means that it is unlikely that symptoms are due to C-cell hyperplasia or medullary thyroid cancer. An elevated concentration of calcitonin means that excessive amounts are being produced. Significantly elevated levels of calcitonin are a good indicator of C-cell hyperplasia or medullary thyroid cancer; however, the healthcare practitioner will use other procedures, such as a thyroid , scan, biopsy and ultrasound, to establish the diagnosis.
With successful treatment for medullary thyroid cancer, which may involve removal of the thyroid gland and often some surrounding tissues, calcitonin levels will usually fall to very low levels. If the values stay low over time, then it is likely that the treatment was effective. In some cases, calcitonin levels will fall but remain moderately elevated after treatment. This means that some calcitonin-producing tissue remains. Healthcare practitioners will monitor calcitonin and watch for increases over time. If calcitonin levels begin to rise, then it is likely that there is a recurrence of medullary thyroid cancer.
With medullary thyroid cancer and C-cell hyperplasia, other thyroid tests, such as T4, T3, and TSH, are usually normal while calcitonin levels are elevated.
Calcitonin levels may also be elevated with lung, breast, and pancreatic cancers, insulinomas (tumor in the pancreas that produces too much insulin), and rare pancreatic tumors called VIPomas (cancer that usually grows from islet cells in the pancreas).
Concentrations of calcitonin may be increased with use of drugs such as epinephrine, glucagon, and oral contraceptives, and are normally higher in newborns as well as in women during pregnancy.
Other conditions with elevated calcitonin include: Intestinal, gastric, or bronchial carcinoid tumors, chronic renal failure, Zollinger-Ellison syndrome, and pernicious anemia. 

rT3, reverse T3
; is a competitive inhibitor to T3 and T4. Leptin resistance is directly correlated with reverse T3. Leptin is a hormone that controls all of energy metabolism in the body. It controls all the other hormones in the body as well. If it is not working well, the rest of your hormones are going to show clinical problems as well. Many people think they have thyroid issues when they actually have leptin resistant. One becomes leptin resistant when the brain no longer recognizes the leptin signal sent from our fat cells. Testing leptin is easy to do but rarely done in medicine today. Biochemically it can be done with thereverse T3 test. Leptin resistance completely turns off your thyroid gland making it so you cannot burn fat in your muscles because it down regulates your basal metabolic rate.

T3, free (Free Triiodothyronine)
 – measures the free, unbound levels of the hormone triiodothyronine – the active thyroid hormone at the cellular level. Because the free levels of T3 represent immediately available hormone, free T3 is thought to better reflect the patient’s hormonal status than total T3.
Elevated Free T3 – Elevated Free T3 may be indicative of hyperthyroidism.
Low Free T3 – Low Free T3 levels below the reference range may be indicative of hypothyroidism.
Optimal Free T3 – Some integrative physicians and hormone experts state that if free T3 is not in the top half – or even the top quarter – of the reference range, it is not optimal. 

T4, free – measures the free, unbound thyroxine levels (the storage hormone), in your bloodstream. Free T4 is typically elevated in hyperthyroidism, and lowered in hypothyroidism. Free or unbound T4 levels represent the level of hormone available for uptake and use by cells. Because the free levels of T4 represent immediately available hormone, free T4 is thought to better reflect the patient’s hormonal status than total T4.


TSH, Thyroid-stimulating hormone 
is a hormone that stimulates the thyroid gland to produce T3 and T4. Releasing hormone from the hypothalamus causes the release of the hormone TSH from the anterior pituitary gland, which finally allows the release of the hormones T3 and T4 from the thyroid gland.  
You could have a perfectly functioning thyroid; but if your pituitary gland is not sending over the correct TSH levels to your thyroid telling it to go to work… Then it doesn’t. If that is the case, you have a lack of T4 & T3 hormones being produced in your body; a condition known as “hypothyroidism”.
If your pituitary gland is constantly bombarding your thyroid with high TSH levels, it kicks the thyroid into overdrive, and your thyroid starts producing too much T3 & T4 hormones. This is what causes the condition known as “hyperthyroidism”.

When the thyroid does not produce enough thyroid hormones, the pituitary detects this reduction in thyroid hormones, and it tries to stimulate the thyroid into action by producing and sending over more TSH. This is the pituitary gland’s effort to return the TSH levels to “normal” and balance the thyroid’s function. Therefore, higher TSH levels than normal suggests a thyroid that is under-active and not doing its job of producing thyroid hormone. So, in general, higher levels of thyroid stimulating hormone equals an under-active thyroid; or hypothyroidism.

And the opposite is true. If the thyroid is overactive and producing too much thyroid hormone, the pituitary senses that there is a thyroid hormone overload circulating through the system.
The pituitary then usually slows or shuts down thyroid stimulation, so that the thyroid will slow down its production of the T3 & T4 hormones. This drop in TSH is the pituitary gland’s attempt to return circulating T3 & T4 hormone levels to normal. Therefore, the TSH test results will show lower than normal TSH when the thyroid is overactive. So, in general, lower TSH levels equals an overactive thyroid; or hyperthyroidism.