Bio-Resonance Results Glossary Vitals Macrominerals

MACROMINERALS

The body requires a number of minerals in order to maintain its proper functioning. The minerals are used for a variety of physiological processes such as building blood and bone, making hormones, regulating heartbeat, and more. There are two types of minerals. Macrominerals are needed in large amounts.

Calcium

 a mineral found in many foods. The body needs calcium to maintain strong bones and teeth, where it supports their structure and hardness and to carry out many important functions. The body needs calcium to maintain strong bones and to carry out many important functions. The body also needs calcium for muscles to move and for nerves to carry messages between the brain and everybody part. In addition, calcium is used to help blood vessels move blood throughout the body and to help release hormones and enzymes that affect almost every function in the human body.

Insufficient intakes of calcium do not produce obvious symptoms in the short term because the body maintains calcium levels in the blood by taking it from bone. Over the long term, intakes of calcium below recommended levels have health consequences, such as causing low bone mass (osteopenia) and increasing the risks of osteoporosis and bone fractures. Osteoporosis is a disease of the bones in older adults (especially women) in which the bones become porous, fragile, and more prone to fracture. 

one of the most important electrolytes in the blood. It helps keep the amount of fluid inside and outside of your cells in balance. It also helps maintain proper blood volume, blood pressure, and pH of your body fluids.

Chloride

 

one of the most important electrolytes in the blood. It helps keep the amount of fluid inside and outside of your cells in balance. It also helps maintain proper blood volume, blood pressure, and pH of your body fluids. 

Magnesium

Magnesium is the central element in chlorophyll and the basis of early life on the planet. Magnesium is needed for more than 300 biochemical reactions in the body. It helps to maintain normal nerve and muscle function, supports a healthy immune system, keeps the heart beat steady, and helps bones remain strong. It also helps regulate blood glucose levels and aid in the production of energy and protein. It plays an important role in the reactions that generate and use ATP, the fundamental unit of energy within the body’s cells. Magnesium is a macro-mineral, which, unlike trace minerals, is needed by the body in large amounts.  Calcium, sodium, and potassium are also macro-minerals.  The average human body contains about 25 grams of magnesium, one of the six essential minerals that must be supplied in the diet. Once magnesium enters the body through food, supplements, or topical applications, it is broken down and released to form independent magnesium atoms, or “ions”. In its ionic form, magnesium has a positive charge, commonly noted as Mg2+. Magnesium cations function as a part of the structure of the body through their presence in bone. But arguably more important is their function as cell regulators in hundreds of chemical reactions throughout the body. 

Magnesium is crucial to more than 300 enzyme-driven biochemical reactions occurring in the body on a near constant basis. All nutrients used by the human body function as either: sources of energy, building blocks for body structures, elements needed to regulate and control the body’s many functions. Like most vitamins, magnesium’s role is primarily regulatory. It allows enzymes to function properly, which in turn enable a vast majority of the body’s chemical reactions. Enzymes are the basis of the body’s ability to function while supporting life. Many of the necessary chemical reactions that the body carries out, such as the breakdown of sugars in the digestive system, can only normally be performed under extreme heat or acidity. Enzymes, however, allow these reactions to occur without damaging the body’s fragile tissues and organs. Yet enzymes do not function alone. Substances known as enzyme co-factors must regulate the functions of enzymes to control the rate of reactions within the body. These co-factors act as “keys” to switches within each enzyme, instructing it to start or stop activity.

Magnesium is one of the most common co-factors in the body. Its presence is crucial to: Glucose and fat breakdown, production of proteins, enzymes and antioxidants such as glutathione, creation of DNA and RNA, Regulation of cholesterol production.
Without enzyme co-factors-including both hormones and vital minerals such as magnesium-reactions could easily spiral out of control. In fact, even slight imbalances can chronically impact the body’s level of performance and health.

Phosphorus

Next to calcium, phosphorus is the most abundant mineral in the body. These 2 important nutrients work closely together to build strong bones and teeth. About 85% of the body’s phosphorus is in bones and teeth. Phosphorous is also present in smaller amounts in cells and tissues throughout the body. Phosphorus helps filter out waste in the kidneys and plays an essential role in how the body stores and uses energy. It also helps reduce muscle pain after a workout. Phosphorus is needed for the growth, maintenance, and repair of all tissues and cells, and to produce the genetic building blocks, DNA and RNA. Phosphorus is also needed to help balance and use other vitamins and minerals, including vitamin D, iodine, magnesium, and zinc.

Potassium

 

Potassium is a very important mineral for the proper function of all cells, tissues, and organs in the human body. It is also an electrolyte, a substance that conducts electricity in the body, along with sodium, chloride, calcium, and magnesium. Potassium is crucial to heart function and plays a key role in skeletal and smooth muscle contraction, making it important for normal digestive and muscular function. potassium may play a role in preventing osteoporosis. studies suggest that increasing potassium intake also reduces the risk of dying from cardiovascular disease, possibly because of potassium’s blood pressure lowering effects. And Studies show that people with a higher sodium-potassium ratio have a higher risk of heart disease and all-cause mortality. People who have a lot of potassium I their diet have a lower risk of stroke.

 

Sodium

 An element that the body needs to work properly. Salt contains sodium. The body uses sodium to control blood pressure and blood volume. Your body also needs sodium for your muscles and nerves to work properly. Too much sodium in the diet may lead to High blood pressure in some people and A serious buildup of fluid in people with heart failure, cirrhosis of the liver, or kidney disease.  

Sulfur

 Is the third most abundant mineral in the body, about half concentrated in your muscles, skin and bones, and is essential for life. Sulfur makes up vital amino acids used to create protein for cells and tissues and for hormones, enzymes, and antibodies. The body uses up its store daily so it must be continually replenished for optimal health and nutrition. Sulfur is needed for insulin production. Insulin controls carbohydrate metabolism, but insufficient sulfur makes it harder for the pancreas to produce enough insulin, and makes cells less able to absorb things from the blood, contributing to blood sugar problems. 

 

Sources:

Calcium

Magnesium in our diet

Magnesium

Phosphorus

Potassium 

Sodium in our diet

Sulfur for better health