Bio-Resonance Results Glossary Vitals Kidney Health

Why are the kidneys important?

Your kidneys remove wastes and extra fluid from your body. Your kidneys also remove acid that is produced by the cells of your body and maintain a healthy balance of water, salts, and minerals—such as sodium, calcium, phosphorus, and potassium—in your blood.

Kidney Function

Blood Urea Nitrogen (BUN)

This is an indicator of kidney function. Urea is a metabolic byproduct which can build up if kidney function is impaired. The BUN-to-creatinine ratio generally provides more precise information about kidney function and its possible underlying cause compared with creatinine level alone. BUN also increases with dehydration.

 

Creatinine, Serum (mg/dL)

Creatinine has been found to be a fairly reliable indicator of kidney function. Elevated creatinine level signifies impaired kidney function or kidney disease. As the kidneys become impaired for any reason, the creatinine level in the blood will rise due to poor clearance of creatinine by the kidneys. Abnormally high levels of creatinine thus warn of possible malfunction or failure of the kidneys. It is for this reason that standard blood tests routinely check the amount of creatinine in the blood.

 

Cystatin C

This is used as a biomarker of kidney function. High levels indicate a decline in kidney function.

 

Proteinuria

Urine containing an abnormal amount of protein. The condition is often a sign of kidney disease. Healthy kidneys do not allow a significant amount of protein to pass through their filters. But filters damaged by kidney disease may let proteins such as albumin leak from the blood into the urine. The two most common risk factors for proteinuria are diabetes and high blood pressure.

 

Uric Acid

The uric acid blood test is used to detect high levels of this compound in the blood in order to help diagnose gout. The test is also used to monitor uric acid levels in people undergoing chemotherapy or radiation treatment for cancer. Rapid cell turnover from such treatment can result in an increased uric acid level. The uric acid urine test is used to help diagnose the cause of recurrent kidney stones and to monitor people with gout for stone formation.

 

Urobilinogen

This is a colourless by-product of bilirubin reduction. It is formed in the intestines by bacterial action on bilirubin. About half of the urobilinogen formed is reabsorbed and taken up via the portal vein to the liver, enters circulation and is excreted by the kidney. Low urine urobilinogen may result from complete obstructive jaundice or treatment with broad-spectrum antibiotics, which destroy the intestinal bacterial flora. (Obstruction of bilirubin passage into the gut or failure of urobilinogen production in the gut.) Low urine urobilinogen levels may result from congenital enzymatic jaundice (hyperbilirubinemia syndromes) or from treatment with drugs that acidify urine, such as ammonium chloride or ascorbic acid.Elevated levels may indicate hemolytic aneamia (excessive breakdown of red blood cells RBC), overburdening of the liver, increased urobilinogen production, re-absorption – a large hematoma, restricted liver function, hepatic infection, poisoning or liver cirrhosis.